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The Reader's Loft Book Group Registration

The Reader's Loft recognizes the importance of book groups as a way of creating community around the written word in these modern and often too-busy times.

We've created our book group registry to offer you and your book group the greatest support we can.

When you register your book group at The Reader's Loft, you receive:
15% OFF Book Group Purchases for Each Member, Online Listing of Your Group's Title Selections, Free Reading Group Guides and any other discussion materials you need, guaranteed availability and connection with other reading groups in the area, for great book suggestions. Click here to download our Book Group Registration Form.

100 Best Books Club

Hamlet
Hamlet By William Shakespeare Saturday, February 24
2:00 PM at Readers Loft


Hamlet is Shakespeare's most popular, and most puzzling, play. It follows the form of a "revenge tragedy," in which the hero, Hamlet, seeks vengeance against his father's murderer, his uncle Claudius, now the king of Denmark. Much of its fascination, however, lies in its uncertainties.


Among them: What is the Ghost--Hamlet's father demanding justice, a tempting demon, an angelic messenger? Does Hamlet go mad, or merely pretend to? Once he is sure that Claudius is a murderer, why does he not act? Was his mother, Gertrude, unfaithful to her husband or complicit in his murder?





 

AAUW Book Group

The Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad By Colson Whitehead
Not Open To Public
Tuesday, February 27


Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves, but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood—where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned—Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

     In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor—engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city’s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.

     Like the protagonist of Gulliver’s Travels, Cora encounters different worlds at each stage of her journey—hers is an odyssey through time as well as space. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the unique terrors for black people in the pre–Civil War era, his narrative seamlessly weaves the saga of America from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. The Underground Railroad is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.




 

Adelante! Book Club

Senator Hattie Caraway: An Arkansas Legacy
Senator Hattie Caraway: An Arkansas Legacy By Nancy Hendricks
Not Open To Public
March 2018


Hattie Caraway unexpectedly became the first female U.S. senator in 1931 by filling the seat of her late husband. What her colleagues viewed as an honorary position was in fact the start of a distinguished career. Despite strong male opposition, Hattie won reelection and loyally and effectively served her constituency for twelve years through the difficult times of the Great Depression and World War II. Join Caraway scholar and historian Dr. Nancy Hendricks to witness Caraway's historic career through previously unseen letters and photos and see how Caraway effected change in the U.S. political landscape.




 

Young Dems

Hidden Figures
Hidden Figures By Margot Lee Shetterly
Not Open To Public
Friday, March 2
6:00 PM at Readers Loft


Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.


Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.


Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.


Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.




 
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